Artikel

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    The Democratic Experiment

    Diposting oleh Wayah

    In the early 1950s, a political style appeared that characterized much of the era after the overthrow of the Ranas. On one side stood the king, who controlled the most powerful force in the nation–the army–and found it an increasingly useful tool with which to wield his prestige and constitutional authority. On the other side stood the political parties. First there was the Nepali Congress Party, which claimed to stand for the democratic will of the people. Then there were a multitude of breakaway factions or other small parties representing a wide range of interests. The Communist Party of Nepal, [...]

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    The Panchayat System under King Mahendra

    Diposting oleh Wayah

    On December 26, 1961, King Mahendra appointed a council of five ministers to help run the administration. Several weeks later, political parties were declared illegal. At first the Nepali Congress leadership propounded a nonviolent struggle against the new order and formed alliances with several political parties, including the Gorkha Parishad and the United Democratic Party, which had been strong critics of the Nepali Congress when it ran the government. Early in 1961, however, the king had set up a committee of four officials from the Central Secretariat to recommend changes in the constitution that would abolish political parties and substitute [...]

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    Modernization under King Birendra

    Diposting oleh Wayah

    When it became apparent that the panchayat system was going to endure, B.P. Koirala and other political exiles began to tone down their revolutionary rhetoric and advocate a reconciliation with the king. On December 30, 1976, Koirala and his close associate, Ganeshman Singh, flew to Kathmandu hoping to “make a fresh attempt.” They were arrested for antinational activities and violence, and a tribunal was set up for a trial. After considerable agitation, Koirala was released in June 1977 because of ill health. He met briefly with the king and then went to the United States for treatment. When he returned [...]

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    Adaptation and Compromise with Hindu and Jain Traditions in the Regional Sultanates

    Diposting oleh Wayah

    Although some historians have attempted to make broad generalizations regarding India’s experience with Islamic rulers, a closer inspection of the historical record reveals a fair measure of diversity in the practice of India’s Islamic courts. Whereas the earliest examples of the Indian Sultanates (such as those based in Delhi) were invariably discriminatory towards Hindus and Muslims of pure Indian stock, some of the later Sultanates (mainly those founded by rulers born and raised in India) were more liberal in practice, and much more inclined to forge cooperative alliances with local Rajputs and other Hindus. Founded by alien conquerors, the Delhi [...]

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